TERC Presents: Fall 2012 Conferences

September 18, 2012

The leaves are turning, a nip is in the air, and TERC staff are busier than ever presenting at an array of conferences up and down the east coast (and beyond). Look for our researchers, curriculum developers, and professional development specialists at the following events:

STEM Smart: Lessons Learned from Successful Schools (A Workshop Hosted by the National Science Foundation)

“Video-rich, Web-based Professional Development to Improve Science Discussions”
Wednesday, September 19th, 2012
University of Nevada-Las Vegas Las Vegas, NV

Presenter: Sue Doubler (TERC: Cambridge, MA)

The Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics report emphasizes three qualities of effective professional development: developing teachers’ ability to teach content, developing instructional practice, and providing sustained opportunity for learning over time. In this session, these qualities are explored in the context of video-rich PD aligned with curriculum. Professional learning focuses on increasing the quality of science discussions. Teachers engage in independent Web study, try idea in their classrooms, and participate in study groups to share their progress. In the session, participants try out nine strategies that support productive discussion.

#Influence12: Symposium & Workshop on Measuring Influence and Social Media

“The Influence of Players’ Interactivity and Identity on Social Games Design for Learning”
Friday, September 28, 2012
Dalhousie University
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

Presenters: Jodi Asbell-Clarke (TERC: Cambridge, MA), Elisabeth Sylvan (TERC: Cambridge, MA)

Association of Science and Technology Centers Annual Conference

“Using Technology to Create Inclusive Experiences for Visitors with Disabilities”
Monday, October 15, 2012, 9:00-10:15 a.m.
Greater Columbus Convention Center
Columbus, OH

Presenters: Judy Vesel (TERC: Cambridge, MA), Christine Reich (Museum of Science, Boston), Marta Beyer (Museum of Science, Boston)

This session will highlight innovative applications of technology to make museum experiences more inclusive of visitors with disabilities. Panelists will share lessons learned and relevant examples from projects for Deaf and hard of hearing visitors, visitors on the autism spectrum, and universally designed digital interactives.

“We are All Learners Here: Becoming a Critically-Reflective Practitioner”
Tuesday, October 16, 2012, 10:45 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Greater Columbus Convention Center
Columbus, OH

Presenters: Andee Rubin (TERC: Cambridge, MA), Sharon Tinianow (Center of Science and Industry: Columbus, OH), Scott Pattison (Oregon Museum of Science and Industry), Joe Heimlich (Ohio State University)

The session will build capacity for organizations by providing real life examples of ways that individuals and organizations are utilizing participant led research to investigate critical questions and solve problems that face us as we attempt to engage our audiences in genuine learning and make a difference in our communities.

30th Annual Closing the Gap Conference

“Introducing the eMapper: A New Tool for Adapting ePages to Meet the Learning Needs of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder"
Thursday, October 18, 2012, 8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m. 
Plaza 2, Doubletree Hilton-Bloomington
Bloomington, MN

Presenter: Judy Vesel (TERC: Cambridge, MA)

Participants will find out what the eMapper is and see a demonstration of the Web version. The demonstration will first provide a view of how to access the eMapper and plug-in. They will see how to use the eMapper toolbar to create virtual page overlays of content for any of the disciplines they teach. They will see how to include customized highlighting, modification of text, masking, sequential text reveals and print versions of pages. They will see how to add or delete links, vocabulary, illustrations and text. They will also have the opportunity to suggest additional features, be given the URLs for downloading the eMapper for use in creating their own modified eMaterial and be invited to participate in ongoing research and development.

NSTA Regional Conference-Louisville

“Teaching Climate and Energy with the CLEAN Collection: Peer-Reviewed Climate and Energy Resources at Your Fingertips!"
Friday, October 19, 2012, 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 
Louisville Marriott
Louisville, KY

Presenter: Marian Grogan (TERC: Cambridge, MA)

Teachers need scientifically and pedagogically robust teaching materials and professional development in rapidly changing scientific areas like climate and energy. The NSF-funded Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN, cleanet.org) meets these needs with a collection of relevant, peer-reviewed teaching materials and teaching tips for teachers of students grades 6-12 and post-secondary. The CLEAN collection features learning activities, curriculum modules, videos, visualizations, and short demonstrations/experiments for all topic areas that are relevant to teaching climate and energy. Topics include the underlying science and research methods used by climate scientists, human contribution and consequences of climate change, solutions and mitigation strategies such as what individuals can do to make a change. Each featured teaching resource has undergone a rigorous science and pedagogical review process and provides teaching tips by experts on how to implement it in the classroom. All material is aligned with the Benchmarks for Science Literacy, the National Science Education Standards and the Excellence in Environment Education Guidelines for Learning. CLEAN has built a community of practitioners in climate education and provides free interactive webinars and workshops on climate and energy topics for educators.

American Evaluation Association Annual Conference

”To Err, Human; To IRR, Divine: A Tutorial on Calculating Inter-rater Reliability (IRR)” 
Thursday, October 25, 2012
Minneapolis Hilton
Minneapolis, MN

Presenter: Lindsay Demers (TERC: Cambridge, MA)

Often, evaluation work involves the application of scoring rubrics to observational data, knowledge assessments, and open-ended survey responses. When such rubrics are used to quantify data, researchers must assess the reliability of the scoring between different observers. The purpose of this demonstration is to walk participants through how to calculate inter-rater reliability (IRR) for nominal, ordinal, and continuous data. In the case of nominal and ordinal data, participants will be shown how to calculate IRR by hand as well as in SPSS. Methods for assessing IRR with continuous data will be demonstrated in SPSS. Additionally, attendees will receive a handout that includes the techniques and formulas used in the presentation, SPSS syntax and screenshots, as well as links to useful web resources. In addition to demonstrating how to calculate IRR, time will also be spent reviewing best practices of IRR assessment as well as the consequences of improper IRR estimation.

”Getting in Synch: Environmental Organizers, Math Educators, and Evaluators Take on Contamination and Numeracy Learning”
Friday, October 26, 2012
Minneapolis Hilton
Minneapolis, MN

Presenter: Martha Merson (TERC: Cambridge, MA)

Evaluators of informal educational interventions may enter semi-public, semi-private settings like living rooms and church community rooms. Under pressure to quantify the academic learning that is taking place, evaluation priorities potentially conflict with participants’ expectations. To gauge changes without pre- and post-assessments of math skills, Statistics for Action (SfA) evaluators designed instruments that supported the principles of the project. The project promoted group work and communication. The evaluators developed focus group protocols and survey questions on group practices and gains. Negotiating conflicting expectations, evaluators adjusted their design to address competing interests of a target audience—community members involved in local environmental issues, including math avoiders; and its client—gung-ho math educators determined to build quantitative literacy in the context of environmental organizing. Project staff share approaches better avoided, methods that elicited evidence of change, and project design choices that enabled evaluators to deliver the data.

California Math Council (South) Mathematics Conference

"Enacting the Math Practices Through Questions and Discussions"
Friday, November 2, 2012, 10:30 a.m.
Ventura Room, Renaissance Hotel 
Palm Springs, CA

Presenter: Karen Economopoulos (TERC: Cambridge, MA)

"What Do the Math Practices Look Like in K-2 Classrooms?"
Saturday, November 3, 2012 
Mesquite E, Palm Springs Convention Center 
Palm Springs, CA

Presenter: Megan Murray (TERC: Cambridge, MA)

NSTA Regional Conference—Atlanta

“Teaching Climate and Energy with the CLEAN Collection: Peer-Reviewed Climate and Energy Resources at Your Fingertips!”
Saturday, November 3, 2012, 8:00-9:00 a.m.
Room B215, Georgia World Congress Center 
Atlanta, GA

Presenters: Marian Grogan (TERC: Cambridge, MA), Candace Dunlap (TERC: Cambridge, MA)

Teachers need scientifically and pedagogically robust teaching materials and professional development in rapidly changing scientific areas like climate and energy. The NSF-funded Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN, cleanet.org) meets these needs with a collection of relevant, peer-reviewed teaching materials and teaching tips for teachers of students grades 6-12 and post-secondary. The CLEAN collection features learning activities, curriculum modules, videos, visualizations, and short demonstrations/experiments for all topic areas that are relevant to teaching climate and energy. Topics include the underlying science and research methods used by climate scientists, human contribution and consequences of climate change, solutions and mitigation strategies such as what individuals can do to make a change. Each featured teaching resource has undergone a rigorous science and pedagogical review process and provides teaching tips by experts on how to implement it in the classroom. All material are aligned with the Benchmarks for Science Literacy, the National Science Education Standards and the Excellence in Environment Education Guidelines for Learning. CLEAN has built a community of practitioners in climate education and provides free interactive webinars and workshops on climate and energy topics for educators.

Geological Society of America Conference

“Evaluating Partnerships in Climate Change Education in the Southeast US” 
Tuesday, November 6, 2012, 1:30-2:30 p.m.
Room 210AB, Charlotte Convention Center
Charlotte, NC

Presenters: Jim Hammerman (TERC: Cambridge, MA), Lesley Strawderman (Mississippi State University)

The Evaluation Group at TERC, in Cambridge, MA, served as the external evaluator for the Climate Literacy Partnership in the SouthEast (CLiPSE) during its Phase I funding through the National Science Foundation’s Climate Change Education Partnership (CCEP) program. CLiPSE brought together experts in climate and learning science, with formal and informal educators to develop a plan to address climate literacy education that would be responsive to the perspectives and values (economic, religious, political, etc.) of the population in the southeastern US. While the project sought to review and make available climate change education resources that would be useful in formal education settings, it also sought to expand to informal contexts by developing “dialog sessions” with community groups, especially faith-based/ evangelical groups, agricultural groups, and leisure groups such as hunters and garden clubs. To reach this wide audience required development of a broad network of partners. Part of our evaluation was to document the growth and development of this network, in collaboration with CLiPSE researchers, and our methods and findings are the topic of this talk.

Data about network expansion included survey data about participants’ opportunities to network, extent of connections, and hopes for the level of integration in the network; qualitative data from conversations about relationships and connections; analysis of network expansion activities (new partners and their characteristics); and comparative social network analyses. Findings show expansion of the size, geographic extent, and quality of the network in a variety of ways. Both methodological and substantive issues will be discussed.

NCTM Regional Conference—Chicago

”Can Children Reason Algebraically?” 
Thursday, November 29, 2012, 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Regency Ballroom A, Chicago Hyatt 
Chicago, IL

Presenter: Maria Blanton (TERC: Cambridge, MA)

Although much evidence exists on how children reason algebraically, we know less about whether this evidence represents what children can do in typical classrooms. This presentation examines both within-grade impacts of a grades 3–5 early algebra classroom intervention and the nature of children’s algebraic reasoning from this intervention.

Literacy Research Association Annual Meeting

”Don’t Dump, Drains to the Brook: Engaging and Assessing Critical Science Literacies through Videomaking” 
Thursday, November 29, 2012, 3:00-4:30 p.m.
Marina III, Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marina 
San Diego, CA

Presenter & Organizer: Eli Tucker-Raymond (TERC: Cambridge, MA)

Contemporary media culture is participatory (Jenkins, 2008). Now, more than ever, young people create media for a public audience or actively speak back to created media, especially in digital spaces (Lenhart, Madden, MacGill, & Smith, 2007). Such participation in media: creative, multimodal, with an authentic audience, and interactive, offers principles for an engaging learning environment that draws on the intellectual and cultural resources of young people. But how do educators use and assess participatory media practices in academic domains?

The purpose of this paper is to explore a methodology for, and discuss findings from, analysis of student videos about an environmental science topic--the health of a local waterway. I suggest that attention to three aspects of student videos may be used to analyze participants’ videos for critical science literacies: a) dimensions of critical science agency--self-regard in science, relationships to content, impact, and stewardship (Basu, Barton, Clairmont, & Locke, 2009); b) the most salient modes and semiotic patterns within and across modes (Hull & Nelson, 2005); and c) identifying various footage, data, and other material sources students used such as interviews and self-collected data (Ranker, 2008).

Data come from seven student-made videos and interviews with four of those students who participated in a summer camp water science education and videomaking workshop. All participants were female campers, rising 6th to 9th graders in a Northeastern city. Interviews were conducted to understand participants’ composing choices for their videos. Multimodal transcripts included interview data, written descriptions of language and sound, and visual representations of video images. Transcripts of videos/interviews were read and coded by two people, using the theoretical frame above. In addition to other activities, participants walked through the neighborhood and to the local brook filming water related subjects. They also interviewed watershed experts, camp staff, and campers. Concurrently, they used imovie to assemble footage into a final project. The workshop met twice a week, 2 hours a day for 8 weeks. Our findings indicate that students were able to integrate a range of sources in their videos, using interviews and music heavily, declared themselves as teaching, and articulated major scientific ideas related to watersheds including: their definition, the effect of runoff, and ecosystem effects of levels of chemical and organic matter in the brook. Thus, participants were able to engage in critical scientific literacy through the production of multimedia texts. Implications for assessing 21st century content literacies are discussed.

Learning Forward Annual Conference

”Transforming Teaching and Learning: A National-to-Local Data Roadmap” 
Monday, December 3, 2012, 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Boston, MA

Presenters: Diana Nunnaley (TERC: Cambridge, MA), Ellen Mandinach (WestEd: Washington, DC)

Develop an understanding of the vision for data use and how to transform quantitative and qualitative data into actionable items. Create a road map that makes the connections from national parameters to how your local use of data can transform teacher learning and dramatically improve classroom learning.

”Effective Data Use: What's a Leader To Do?” 
Monday, December 3, 2012, 2:30-5:30 p.m.
Boston, MA

Presenters: Diana Nunnaley (TERC: Cambridge, MA), Jennifer Unger (The GroupWorks: Grafton, MA), Mary Wermers (Danvers Public Schools: Danvers, MA), Susan Ambrozavitch (Danvers Public Schools: Danvers, MA), Sharon Burrill (Danvers Public Schools: Danvers, MA)

Explore the role of leadership in shaping the culture and context for effective data use, drawing from research and best practice. Learn about a district's three-year journey to move staff toward effective use of data. Engage with data leadership tools, identify and assess your own current knowledge and skill set, and identify potential next steps.

NSTA Regional Conference—Phoenix

“Teaching Climate and Energy with the CLEAN Collection: Peer-Reviewed Climate and Energy Resources at Your Fingertips!”
Saturday, December 8, 2012, 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Room 230, Phoenix Convention Center 
Phoenix, AZ

Presenters: Marian Grogan (TERC: Cambridge, MA), Candace Dunlap (TERC: Cambridge, MA)

Teachers need scientifically and pedagogically robust teaching materials and professional development in rapidly changing scientific areas like climate and energy. The NSF-funded Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN, cleanet.org) meets these needs with a collection of relevant, peer-reviewed teaching materials and teaching tips for teachers of students grades 6-12 and post-secondary. The CLEAN collection features learning activities, curriculum modules, videos, visualizations, and short demonstrations/experiments for all topic areas that are relevant to teaching climate and energy. Topics include the underlying science and research methods used by climate scientists, human contribution and consequences of climate change, solutions and mitigation strategies such as what individuals can do to make a change. Each featured teaching resource has undergone a rigorous science and pedagogical review process and provides teaching tips by experts on how to implement it in the classroom. All material are aligned with the Benchmarks for Science Literacy, the National Science Education Standards and the Excellence in Environment Education Guidelines for Learning. CLEAN has built a community of practitioners in climate education and provides free interactive webinars and workshops on climate and energy topics for educators.